Inspection & testing

Overview

All electrical installations are required to be routinely inspected and tested to ensure continued safe operation and compliance to current regulations.

If you are unaware of when your next test is due, a label or notice should be displayed near to the distribution board (fuseboard) detailing the date of the last inspection and the recommended date of the next one.

Most insurance companies will not pay out after an electrical fire if a valid periodic inspection report is not in place.

For advice or more information on the requirement of inspection and testing, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Details

All electrical installations are required to be routinely inspected and tested to ensure continued safe operation and compliance to current regulations. Depending on the location, use and condition of the installation, the frequency of testing and inspection varies - typically most businesses and homes should be tested every five years or change of occupancy, whichever comes sooner.

Installations that have deteriorated or are subject to higher risk (e.g. construction sites, temporary installations) are required to be tested and inspected more frequently. If you are unaware of when your next test is due, a label or notice should be displayed near to the distribution board (fuseboard) detailing the date of the last inspection and the recommended date of the next one.

A “Periodic Inspection Report” involves visually inspecting the installation to verify compliance with current regulations, to identify any damage or defects to the installation, and to verify the appropriate selection and location of equipment. A pre-agreed percentage of accessories and fittings will be removed to inspect the electrical connections, and electrical testing is completed to verify earth continuity, insulation resistance, and operation of safety devices within required disconnection times. All items identified on the report are categorized under four headings:

  1. Urgent attention required (a risk of electric shock or fire exists)
  2. Requires improvements (an unsafe situation exists but is not immediately life threatening)
  3. Requires further investigation (an item that could not be fully verified during the periodic inspection, such as an un-locatable circuit, or fault identified by testing but not located)
  4. Does not comply with BS7671 but not unsafe. (A minor situation that doesn’t comply with current regulations but is not a concern for safety, e.g. Circuits not identified at the fuseboard, previous test certificates not available for inspection etc)

The report identifies and details faults, damage and non compliances to be addressed without any obligation to use the same contractor to rectify them.

Most insurance companies will not pay out after an electrical fire if a valid periodic inspection report is not in place. All electrical work, no matter how minor requires the completion of an electrical certificate and testing, these certificates should be kept safe for inspection during your next periodic inspection report.

For advice or more information on the requirement of inspection and testing, please do not hesitate to contact us.